January 8, 2014
image via Eva & Paul
Eva & Paul is a new women’s premium denim line, featuring products that are sustainably sourced and made in the U.S. All their cotton is sourced from family farms in India, hand printed by Indian artisans and sewn in the NYC garment district.
While I commend any and all efforts to increase fair-trade and sustainable practices in garment manufacturing, I’m disappointed by the scope of the endeavor. The line only features three styles: a slim, a bootcut, and a trouser in a dark indigo wash.
What I balk at is not the count of styles available but their simplicity. It frustrates me that so often, fashion companies that attempt to innovate their business practices do so with such basic product. From a retail perspective, producing and selling basics might seem like a great way to drive some volume; after all, doesn’t everyone need a pair of easy great jeans?
The flaw in this premise is that basic product will always remain just that, basic. It is highly unlikely to ever generate the sort of style momentum required to make the movement towards conscious garment production more than just a frivolity. And, given the sad state of affairs of labor in the garment industry, that would truly be a shame.

image via Eva & Paul

Eva & Paul is a new women’s premium denim line, featuring products that are sustainably sourced and made in the U.S. All their cotton is sourced from family farms in India, hand printed by Indian artisans and sewn in the NYC garment district.

While I commend any and all efforts to increase fair-trade and sustainable practices in garment manufacturing, I’m disappointed by the scope of the endeavor. The line only features three styles: a slim, a bootcut, and a trouser in a dark indigo wash.

What I balk at is not the count of styles available but their simplicity. It frustrates me that so often, fashion companies that attempt to innovate their business practices do so with such basic product. From a retail perspective, producing and selling basics might seem like a great way to drive some volume; after all, doesn’t everyone need a pair of easy great jeans?

The flaw in this premise is that basic product will always remain just that, basic. It is highly unlikely to ever generate the sort of style momentum required to make the movement towards conscious garment production more than just a frivolity. And, given the sad state of affairs of labor in the garment industry, that would truly be a shame.

January 6, 2014
Four killed in Cambodian garment worker strike in Phnom Penh. Read more from Al Jazeera.

Four killed in Cambodian garment worker strike in Phnom Penh. Read more from Al Jazeera.

January 6, 2014

One of the world’s biggest clothing buyers, the United States government spends more than $1.5 billion a year at factories overseas, acquiring everything from the royal blue shirts worn by airport security workers to the olive button-downs required for forest rangers and the camouflage pants sold to troops on military bases. But even though the Obama administration has called on Western buyers to use their purchasing power to push for improved industry working conditions after several workplace disasters over the last 14 months, the American government has done little to adjust its own shopping habits.


"U.S. Flouts Its Own Advice in Procuring Overseas Clothing" by Ian Urbina via NYT

One of the world’s biggest clothing buyers, the United States government spends more than $1.5 billion a year at factories overseas, acquiring everything from the royal blue shirts worn by airport security workers to the olive button-downs required for forest rangers and the camouflage pants sold to troops on military bases.

But even though the Obama administration has called on Western buyers to use their purchasing power to push for improved industry working conditions after several workplace disasters over the last 14 months, the American government has done little to adjust its own shopping habits.

"U.S. Flouts Its Own Advice in Procuring Overseas Clothing" by Ian Urbina via NYT